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Cameroon

Focus Regions





Main Challenge: Persistence of Illiteracy among Girls.

Taking aside the legacy of colonialism and ethnic inequalities in some of the many regions in Cameroon, a number of other factors explain the continuing disparities in learning between rural and urban schoolchildren. Considering the significance of rural poverty across the country, it should come as no surprise that rural schoolchildren are the most disadvantaged from a socioeconomic perspective when it comes to access to a quality education. Rural schools generally have less adequate schools and not enough teachers for the number of children enrolled. The reasons for these low numbers in rural area are many and very much linked to poverty and other inequalities and socioeconomic conditions including the lack of good school infrastructure. The world diaspora involved at the Diaspora World Cup view this just not as bad news but also as a challenge to face.

While 64 percent of girls in Cameroon enroll in primary school, more than half drop out by the fifth grade, only 11 percent continue on to study at the secondary level, and just 1 percent continue on to college according to USAID. Among children who finish primary school in, nearly two-thirds leave the system without basic reading, writing and math skills. USAIDs strategy calls for close collaboration with schools, teachers, administrators, parents, and communities to improve early grade reading outcomes. That includes: training teachers and school directors, improving learning materials, encouraging the use of reading diagnostic tools, and promoting greater parent and community engagement in education. Note that one important missing piece in the struggle of children is the lack of schools infrastructure. The Diaspora World Cup will build and equip schools with many items including electricity and toilets and that our promise to those children to eradicate illiteracy around the world through the power of soccer.

Centre


Total Population: 1,817,524 (GeoHive)
Out of School Children in the country: 842,000 (DHS)
Challenges: Overcrowded Classroom - Lack of Schools Infrastructure

The Cameroon most recent household survey (ECAM III), undertaken in 2007, revealed that poverty
affected an estimated 39.9 per cent of the population, compared with 40.2 per cent in 2001, and that 55
per cent of the country poor people live in rural areas. The ECAM III survey also found that significant disparities
in poverty trends had emerged between 2001 and 2007. In urban areas, poverty showed a marked decline points
particularly in the cities of Douala and Yaound. In contrast, in rural areas, poverty had grown by 3 points, especially
in the North. On top of that, lack of primary schools is aggravating the situation particularly in the region of Adamaoua.

The region of Centre has a population of 1,817,524 (GeoHive) and 20-30%
out of school children between the ages of 7-14 according to the Demographic and Health
Survey. The region is in serious threat to fall behind and is in needs more than 20 schools we believe
to keep our promised made to children around the world to eradicate illiteracy through the Power of Soccer.

Nord-Ouest


Total Population: 1,900,547 (GeoHive)
Out of School Children in the country: 588,000 (DHS)
Challenges: Overcrowded Classroom - Lack of Schools Infrastructure

This seems like a pretty obvious one if you dont have a classroom, you
dont really have much of a chance of getting a decent education. But again, thats a
reality for millions of children worldwide mostly in Sub-Saharan Africa. Children in Cameroon
for example are often squeezed into overcrowded classrooms, classrooms that are falling apart, or
are learning outside. Another alarming barrier to education in the Nord-Ouest region is the simple fact
that there are more than 100 children per classroom according to UNESCO. Its not just a lack of classrooms
thats the problem, but also all the basic facilities you would expect a school to have like running water and toilets.

The region of Nord-Ouest has a population of 1,900,547 (GeoNames) and 10% out of school
children between the ages of 7-14 according to the Demographic and Health Survey. The region
needs more than 20 schools to sustain its needs and keep our promises made to children around the world.

Ouest


Total Population: 1,865,394 (GeoHive)
Out of School Children in the country: 842,000 (DHS)
Challenges: Overcrowded Classroom - Lack of Schools Infrastructure

The high population density in west regions of Cameroon contributes to classroom overcrowding
and very often students must walk many miles to nearby towns in order to attend primary school for some
basic education. Overcrowded classrooms and few toilets, often without separation between boys and girls are
some of the problems facing primary school students in Cameroon according to UNESCO Institute for Statistics (UIS).

The West region of Cameroon has a population of 1,865,394 (GeoHive) and 10%
out of school children between the ages of 7-14 according to the Demographic and Health
Survey. The survey shows that a child in Cameroon is likely to study in an overcrowded classroom
that can number as many as 100 pupils. Moreover, many classes in the west region are multi-grade
and grouping children of different levels of education. The West region is in urgent needs of schools and
we anticipate more than 30 schools will be built by our schools construction program to alleviate the situation.

Est


Total Population: 824,204 (GeoHive)
Out of School Children in the country: 588,000 (DHS)
Challenges: Overcrowded Classroom - Lack of Schools Infrastructure

More than 52 per cent of people in poor households in Cameroon are women particularly
girls under 15 years of age according to UNESCO. According to ECAM III, only 18 per cent of rural
women have secondary-level education, and women living in the north and far-north regions receive the
least education - 12 per cent and 14 per cent respectively. The data from the East region of the country showed
that its not difficult to predict what the future holds for adolescent girls who never go to school or study at home.

The East region has a population of 824,204 (GeoHive) and 20% out of school children between the ages of
7-14 according to the Demographic and Health Survey. Those girls who dont go to school will join the worlds 77
million young illiterate women, unable to read or write a simple sentence, let alone help their children with homework.



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